Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’

Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ or simply known as Hydrangea ‘Preziosa’, is also known as Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Preziosa’, though sometimes it is called macrophylla it is a compact and smaller shrub, it is hardier, and has serrated leaves, therefore it should be distinguished from macrophylla. It is a deciduous shrub that is part of the Hydrangeaceae family of plants. Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ is native to Korea and Japan. It is commonly called Mountain Hydrangea or Tea of Heaven. Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ grows to about 4ft or 1.2m.

Hydrangea serrata 'Preziosa'
Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’

Plant Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ in rich soil, moist but well-drained in partial shade but they don’t like to dry out and if you can keep them moist but not soggy then the full sun would work as well. As with other types of Hydrangea, soil acidity can change the color the flowers more acidic flower the bluer the flower. Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ foliage is purple-tinted and turns green when mature but turns to deep red in autumn. The flowers which appear in clumps start as cream-colored then turn pink and later deep red. Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ flowers in late summer and early autumn.

Hydrangea serrata 'Preziosa'
Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ at Kew Garden, London

Propagate Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’ by seeds indoors or softwood cuttings. Generally pest-free and disease-free but watch out for bud blight, bacterial wilt, mildew, and leaf spot. Prune back after flowering.

Hydrangea serrata 'Preziosa'
Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’
Hydrangea serrata 'Preziosa'
Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’
Hydrangea serrata 'Preziosa'
Hydrangea serrata ‘Preziosa’

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I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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