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Liriope muscari

Liriope muscari is also known as Liriope platyphylla, Liriope graminifolia, Ophiopogon graminifolius, or commonly known as Big blue Lilyturf, Lilyturf, Border Grass, or Monkey Grass.

It is part of the Asparagaceae family of plants. Liriope muscari is native to Japan, China, and Taiwan. It is an evergreen. It is a clump-forming tuberous perennial. It is a hardy plant. Liriope muscari has dark leathery grass-like or blade-like foliage.

Liriope muscari
Liriope muscari

Liriope muscari grows to about 45cm or 18in tall. It has fibrous roots and terminal tubers. The Liriope muscari flowers are violet. They appear on erect spikes with whorls of flowers. Liriope muscari flowers in late summer. Later, they turn into blackish berries. The berries provide winter interest. Propagate Liriope muscari by division during the dormant season.

Liriope muscari
Liriope muscari at Kew Garden, London, UK

Place Liriope muscari in the shade or partial shade. Plant it in moist, acid soil that is also well-drained. Once it is established, it tolerates drought. Water it during its first season until it is established, then in should tolerate drought. In colder climates, shelter it from cold and dry winds. Plant them 1ft or 30cm apart as they will spread.

For new growth, cut back old leaves in spring. Liriope muscari is easy to grow. And it is low-maintenance. It is disease-free. But watch out for slugs especially when leaves are young. It is considered invasive in North America.

Liriope muscari
Liriope muscari
Liriope muscari

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I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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