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Leonotis leonurus

Leonotis leonurus is part of the Lamiaceae family of plants or more commonly called the mint family. This erect, evergreen shrub is native to South Africa. It usually grows in moist grasslands. They also call it Phlomis leonurus, Lion’s Ear, Lion’s Tail, or Wild Dagga.

Leonotis leonurus, Lion's Tail
Leonotis leonurus or Lion’s Tail

It grows to about 6ft or 2m tall. It has green, aromatic leaves that are about 4in or 10cm long. The flowers are orange, tubular, and two-lipped. They grow in whorls during summer months sometimes continuing into late autumn depending on the climate.

Leonotis leonurus
Leonotis leonurus

How to grow Leonotis leonurus:

Leonotis leonurus is easy to grow. Grow it in the sun or light shade. Plant it in any type of soil that is well-drained. It likes moisture yet it is drought tolerant. Leonotis leonurus is generally disease-free and pest-free. Watch out for whiteflies, spider mites, grey mold. It is deer resistant. Leonotis leonurus attracts birds, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Prune it each year as it helps it grow bushier. Propagate by seed or cuttings.

Leonotis leonurus contains the substance leonurine and marrubin. They believe the leaves possess antinociceptive and antiinflammatory and hypoglycemic properties. They also use this plant’s flower and seeds in traditional medicine to treat tuberculosis, jaundice, muscle cramps, diabetes, and viral hepatitis. The roots and bark are used to treat snakebites or scorpion stings.

Leonotis leonurus
Leonotis leonurus
Leonotis leonurus
Leonotis leonurus

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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