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Anemone coronaria, ‘Mona Lisa® Wine, White Bicolor’

Anemone coronaria ‘Mona Lisa® Wine White Bicolor’ is a hybrid of Anemone coronaria also known as Poppy Anemone, Spanish Marigold or Windflower and the botanical name means crown anemone which refers to the central dark crown in each flower. It is part of the Ranunculaceae family of plants.

Anemone coronaria, 'Mona Lisa® Wine White Bicolor'
Anemone coronaria ‘Mona Lisa® Wine White Bicolor’

Anemone is originally native to the Mediterranean region. Anemone coronaria ‘Mona Lisa® Wine White Bicolor’ can grow to 46cm or 18in. It’s a tuberous herbaceous perennial. The tubers are dark and hard.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mona Lisa® Wine White Bicolor’ has a basal rosette of deeply lobed leaves. The flowers appear in autumn or spring, usually October to April, depending on your climate, and single stems with some leaves just below the flower. Anemone coronaria ‘Mona Lisa® Wine White Bicolor’ flowers have about 5 to 8 petals and they are bicolor a mixture of deep red wine color and white, almost appearing as each petal or flower was painted with a brush. It has tightly packed pistils in the center of the flower with a ring of stamens.

Anemones produce a lot of seeds each flower can produce up to 300 seeds. Plant the tubers after soaking them in water and plant them 5cm or 2in deep. Plant them in average, moist soil but well-drained and place them in the sun. Anemone coronaria ‘Mona Lisa® Wine White Bicolor’ makes a good cut flower that can last up to 7 days in a vase.

Anemone coronaria, 'Mona Lisa® Wine White Bicolor'
Anemone coronaria ‘Mona Lisa® Wine White Bicolor’

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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