Please Support This Free Site By Visiting Our Advertisers or Sponsors!

Berberis aquifolium or Mahonia aquifolium

Berberis aquifolium or Mahonia aquifolium? That is the question, evidently, botanist cannot agree and keep shifting from one to the other. But it is the same plant no matter what they call it. It is also known as Mahonia piperiana, Holly-leaved Barberry, Broadleaf evergreen, Mountain Grape, Rocky Mountain Grape, Oregon Grape, or Oregon Grape Holly.

Berberis aquifolium
Berberis aquifolium

It is part of the Berberidaceae family of plants. Berberis aquifolium is native to North America. It is an evergreen bush. Aquifolium refers to the foliage meaning sharp-leafed. But this plant is neither related to Holly or grapes.

Berberis aquifolium has glossy green leaves, holly-like with spikes. The leaves change color in winter to shades of purple. Berberis aquifolium flowers in spring. The flowers are yellow and appear in large clusters. After flowering, it produces purplish-black berries. Berries attract birds, especially in winter. The berries are tart and contain seeds. They are sometimes consumed as jelly, wine.

Berberis aquifolium
Berberis aquifolium or Mahonia aquifolium

Locate Berberis aquifolium in the sun or partial shade. Plant it in humus-rich, fertile, moist but well-drained soil. It adapts to most types of soils. And it is drought-resistant once established.

Berberis aquifolium is generally pest-free, but watch out for powdery mildew. The bark of Berberis aquifolium is sometimes used to make a yellow dye and the berries for purple dye.

Berberis aquifolium
Berberis aquifolium
Berberis aquifolium
Berberis aquifolium

Also read about Berberis darwinii or Berberis candidula

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*