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Agastache cana

Agastache cana is also known as Mosquito Plant, Texas Hummingbird Mint, Hyssop, or Hummingbird Mint. It is from the mint family or Lamiaceae. It is easy to grow.

This perennial just like mint has aromatic foliage. Agastache cana is native to the Southern United States. Cana means grey and refers to the greyish-green leaves of this plant.

Agastache cana grows to 3′ or 90cm tall and loves the sun. The leaves when crushed smell like mint. Agastache cana has bright pink flowers that bloom from late spring, summer to fall. It contributes a lot of color to the landscape for a long period of the season.

The flowers are tubular and grow on tall spikes. Five petals fused together, make the tube. The flowers are hermaphroditic. This means they have both male and female parts. Agastache cana attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. But it is deer resistant.

Agastache cana
Agastache cana

How to grow Agastache cana:

Grow Agastache cana in the sun or partial shade. Plant it in average, medium to dry soil that is well-drained. The sun is better than partial shade, it will increase flowering. Agastache cana tolerates heat, drought and humidity. It is great for borders but also can be planted in containers. Agastache cana is self-seeding so if you don’t want it to spread then remove the faded flowers. It is disease-free and pest-free.

The common name Mosquito plant is due to aroma of the leaves when crushed on human skin reportedly repels mosquitos.

Agastache cana
Agastache cana
Agastache cana
Agastache cana

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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