Achillea millefolium

Achillea millefolium or Common Yarrow is known by many common names such as Devil’s Nettle, Thousand Weed, Thousand-leaf, Thousand Seal, Hundred-leaved Grass, Gordaldo, Milfoil, Nosebleed, Nosepepper, Lace Plant, Old Man’s Pepper, Soldiers Woundwort, Plumajillo, Savory Tea, or Sanguinary, it was also known as these Latin names Achillea ambigua or Achillea millefolium var. nigrescens. In ancient cultures, this plant was known as herbal militaris and used for suppressing blood from wounds.

Achillea millefolium
Achillea millefolium at St James’s Park, London

This is from the Asteraceae family of plants. Achillea millefolium is a spreading rhizomatous, herbaceous perennial with pinnate leaves I think some of the names do refer to the type of leaves that are very fine and feathery. It is native to Europe and Western Asia. Achillea millefolium is multi-stemmed. The flowers of Achillea millefolium appear in summer, in flat heads, and are creamy-pink color. They are fragrant similar to Chrysanthemums.

Achillea millefolium
Achillea millefolium at St James’s Park, London

Plant Achillea millefolium in the sun, in moist but well-drained soil. It grows from 10 to 50cm or 4 to 20in. Propagate from seed, sown not deeper than 1/4in or 6mm, or division. Achillea millefolium requires no pruning except for some deadheading. Watch out for aphids or powdery mildew.

Achillea millefolium
Achillea millefolium at St James’s Park, London

Achillea millefolium is used to feed livestock in Australia and New Zealand, where it is considered a weed. The name Achillea comes from Achilles who used to carry it in battles to treat his soldiers’ wounds and millefolium refers to the feathery leaves or as it means thousands of leaves. It also was used for stopping nosebleeds. In China Yarrow and Tortoiseshell are considered good luck. Otherwise, it is also used for dying wool, for making beer, and medicinal research is conducted for its anti-inflammatory benefits. Of course, historically it has been part of medicinal use in a variety of cultures such as Greek, Indian, Native American. This plant was discovered in Neanderthal tombs dating around 60,000 BCE.

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

Dino
I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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