Please Support This Free Site By Visiting Our Advertisers or Sponsors!

Lilium Martagon or Martagon Lily

Lilium Martagon or Martagon Lily is also known as Mountain Lily or Turk’s Cap Lily, Lily of Istanbul, Sultan Lily, or Dragon Lily. It is part of the Liliaceae family of plants. It is a herbaceous plant that grows from a bulb. It has a very wide native region from West Europe to Asia and Mongolia.

Lilium Martagon is clump-forming. It has strong erect stems and narrow leaves. It grows racemes of nodding flowers with recurved petals. The shape of these petals resembles Turkish turbans and therefore has influenced its name. Lilium Martagon flowers in summer. The flowers are fragrant. They grow in a range of colors. And they have spots. Each plant can produce almost 50 flowers. This makes a nice display in the landscape. Lilium Martagon is also a wonderful cut-flower.

Lilium Martagon
Lilium Martagon or Martagon Lily at St James’s Park, London

How to grow Lilium Martagon:

Grow it in the sun. Plant Lilium Martagon about 6 to 8in or 15 to 20cmm deep. Use a moist, humus-rich soil that is well-drained. Deadhead the flowers. Cut the stem to the ground level at the end of autumn. It can grow about 1.5m or 5ft.

Lilium Martagon
Lilium Martagon

This plant is highly toxic to cats. even cut flowers or dried flowers could harm cats. If ingested, it causes fatal kidney failure. Even if cats brush against the flowers and get any pollen on them, they could be endangered as they might lick the pollen from their fur.

Lilium Martagon
Lilium Martagon
Lilium Martagon
Lilium Martagon

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*