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Euonymus alatus

Euonymus alatus is also known as the Winged Spindle, Burning Bush, Winged Euonymus. It is part of the Celastraceae family of plants. It is native to Northeast Asia and China. Get Euonymus alatus if you are looking for the spectacular red color in autumn foliage.

It is a large deciduous shrub. Euonymus alatus foliage is oval and green but and turn a rosy-crimson red in autumn. It can grow to 6m or 20ft tall. The stems have wings or ridges and the name alatus, or alata is from Latin meaning winged.

Euonymus alatus
Euonymus alatus

Euonymus alatus flowers in the summer. The flowers are small yellowish-green. After flowering, Euonymus alatus produces purplish-red fruits with orange seeds inside. It is not necessary to say that it is not grown for its flowers, but the color of its autumn foliage.

Euonymus alatus
Euonymus alatus

Place Euonymus alatus in the sun or partial shade. Plant it in moist but well-drained soil. Prune damaged branches in late winter. Propagate Euonymus alatus through semi-hard cuttings. It is an easy-to-maintain plant and it is generally pest-free, but watch out for powdery mildew.

Prune damaged branches in winter or early spring. Mulch annually with compost or manure. Also, prune the plant to the shape and size you need. Limit overhead watering to prevent the growth of fungal issues.

Euonymus alatus is toxic to pets and all parts are toxic if ingested. It is considered an invasive plant in the northeast United States. Euonymus alatus is used in Chinese and Korean traditional medicine to treat hyperglycemia, diabetes, or cancer.

Euonymus alatus
Euonymus alatus

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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