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Sisyrinchium striatum

Sisyrinchium striatum is also known as Phaiophelps nigricans, Yellow Mexican Satin Flower, Paneguia striataBermudiana striataFerraria ochroleucaMarica striata, Moraea sertula, or Pale Yellow-eyed Grass. It is part of the Iridaceae or the Iris family of plants. Sisyrinchium striatum is a clump-forming perennial. It is native to Argentina and Chile. It is a grassy plant. Sisyrinchium striatum grows to 90cm or 3ft tall.

Sisyrinchium striatum
Sisyrinchium striatum

Sisyrinchium striatum foliage is grayish-green, lance-shaped, and narrow. Sisyrinchium striatum flowers appear in late spring or summer on tall stems with many bracts of clustered, star-shaped pale yellow flowers. The flowers have six petals with darker lines on the outside of the petals.

The flowers last one day, opening up in the morning and closing in the evening. Locate Sisyrinchium striatum in the sun. Plant it in poor or moderately fertile, moist soil that is well-drained as it does not like excessive moisture even in the winter. Cut any dead or discolored leaves. The leaves turn almost black when they die down. Sisyrinchium striatum is generally pest-free or disease-free, but watch out for root rot.

Sisyrinchium striatum
Sisyrinchium striatum

Propagate Sisyrinchium striatum by seed or division. The best time to divide the plant is in spring. Sisyrinchium striatum self-seeds, remove dead flowers to stop them from self-seeding.

Sisyrinchium striatum is beautiful in borders, cottage gardens as well as rock gardens it brings lovely heights and color to the landscape.

Sisyrinchium striatum
Sisyrinchium striatum

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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