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Punica granatum var. nana

Punica granatum var. nana is a deciduous, thorny and rounded shrub. It is evergreen in warm winter climates. It is part of the Lythraceae family of plants. They also call it Punica granatum ‘Nana‘, Pomegranate ‘Nana’, Granada ‘Nana’, Carthaginian Apple ‘Nana‘, or Dwarf Pomegranate. It can grow to 1m or 3ft tall. Punica granatum var. nana was first described in 1803 and is a dwarf variety. It is a good candidate for Bonsai as well as growing in containers indoors.

Punica granatum var. nana
Punica granatum var. nana at Kew Gardens, London, UK

Punica granatum var. nana has glossy narrow and oblong leaves. They are bright green but they start slightly bronzish. The flowers turn yellow in autumn in colder climates. The flowers are bright orangish-red color. They are about 4cm or about 1.75in. in size. The flowers are funnel-shaped and grow at branch tips. Punica granatum var. nana flowers in the summer. It produces a reddish-brown miniature-sized fruit after flowering. The fruit has leathery skin. The fruits are edible but a bit too sour.

Punica granatum var. nana
Punica granatum var. nana

How to grow Punica granatum var. nana:

Grow Punica granatum var. nana in the sun. Plant it in rich, fertile, and well-drained soil. Water well during the growing period. When Punica granatum var. nana establishes itself it is drought-tolerant. Remove wayward shoots. Propagate by seed or semi-hardwood cuttings. Punica granatum var. nana is generally disease-free and pest-free. It is deer-tolerant.

Punica granatum var. nana
Punica granatum var. nana

Also read about Punica granatum or Pomegranate.

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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