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Spathodea campanulata

Spathodea campanulata is an evergreen, tropical tree. It is from the Bignoniaceae family of plants. They also call it the African Tulip Tree, Fountain Tree, Nandi Flame, Nile Flame, Squirt Tree, Uganda Flame, Flame Tree of Thika. This tree is native to tropical Africa. In its native habitat, it grows to 80ft or 26m tall. However, in other regions, it only grows to 35ft or 12m tall.

Spathodea campanulata
Spathodea campanulata

Names in other languages include Fakkelboom, Afrika-vlamboom in Afrikaans, Immortel Etranger in French, Rugtoora in Hindi, African Poomaram in Malayalam, Panchut-Panchut in Malay, Amapola, Espatodea, Tulipan Africano, in Spanish.

Spathodea campanulata has a rough-textured trunk that is grayish. The foliage is opposite, pinnately compound. They are leathery and dark green. The leaves start as bronze-colored and then turn green. Spathodea campanulata flowers in late summer or autumn. The flowers grow in terminal clusters. They are tulip-shaped, orangish-red, and have five petals. These flowers hold water and are rather popular with birds. Spathodea campanulata flowers are bisexual and zygomorphic. Its seeds grow in brownish elongated pods and are thin, flat, and winged.

Spathodea campanulata
Spathodea campanulata at Echo Park in Los Angeles, California

How to grow Spathodea campanulata:

Grow Spathodea campanulata in the sun. Plant it in most types of soils as long as it is well-drained. It is generally disease-free and pest-free. Spathodea campanulata is invasive in many tropical regions such as Hawaii and the Pacific Islands.

Spathodea campanulata
Spathodea campanulata

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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