Gladiolus

Gladiolus is also known as Sword-Lilies, Gladiolus callianthus murielle, Abyssinian Sword Lily, Gladiolus grandiflorus, Gladiolus communis sup Byzanthinus, Byzantine Gladiolus or Gladiolus nanus. It is part of the Iridaceae family of plants. It is called Sword Lily due to its shape and size of the stem containing the flowers. It is probably one of the more popular cut flowers. They are easy to grow but they do require some sort of support. They grow from corms that have green sword-shaped leaves and trumpet-shaped flowers that appear on spikes. They are native to South Africa and Mediterranean countries.

Gladiolus
Gladiolus

Gladiolus should be planted in the sun in humus-rich soil, with medium moisture but the most type of soil works except clay. You can plant them in spring to early summer. Larger corms should be planted about 6in or 15cm deep small ones can be planed 3in or 7cm deep. They usually look better planted closer to each other about 5in or 12cm, they are slender and vertical and they can support each other. Gladiolus flowers in wide range of colors from white, yellow, to pink, orange, purple, red, etc.

Gladiolus usually flower for about two weeks and you can prolong flowering season by planting corms in consecutive 2-week increments. You can plant them up too early July for each year. You can remove corms six weeks after flowering if you would like to store them in the winter or you can use a mulch to protect them where they are. However, if they leave them outside divide them every couple of years. Propagate Gladiolus by dividing corms when dormant. They could be vulnerable to grey mold, corm rot, thrips, aphids, or slugs.

Gladiolus
Gladiolus

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

Dino
I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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