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Eriocapitella rivularis or Anemone rivularis

Eriocapitella rivularis is a part of the Ranunculaceae family of plants. In 2018, Dr. Maarten J. M. Christenhusz (Born 1976), a Dutch botanist, and Dr. James W. Byng, a British botanist, described it as Eriocapitella rivularis. Previously, in 1817 it was placed in the Anemone genus as Anemone rivularis. It is native to Asia. It usually grows on streamsides or meadows on the margins of forests.

Eriocapitella rivularis is a herbaceous perennial plant. Rivularis means waterside, referring to the plant’s habitat. It has rhizome-like roots. They also call it Riverside Flower, Riverside Windflower, and Cao Yu Mei in Chinese. Eriocapitella rivularis is clump-forming. It forms basal leaves with almost 15cm or 6in long petioles. The leaves are lobed and have three sections. They are almost pentagon-shaped.

Eriocapitella rivularis
Eriocapitella rivularis

It also produces long flowering stems with whorls of leaves around. The leaves on these stems are smaller than the basal leaves. Flower stalks grow from these stems. The individual flowers usually have five to ten sepals. There are no petals. The flowers are white with a hint of blue in the back. It has a lot of pistils surrounding the stamens. The anthers are a slate blue color. Eriocapitella rivularis flowers in the summer.

Eriocapitella rivularis
Eriocapitella rivularis or Anemone rivularis

How to grow Eriocapitella rivularis or Anemone rivularis:

Grow Eriocapitella rivularis in the sun or partial shade. Plant it in moist but well-drained soil. Propagate by division. The best time is early spring. Cut it back after flowering. Watch out for slugs, caterpillars, eelworms, and powdery mildew.

Eriocapitella rivularis
Eriocapitella rivularis or Anemone rivularis

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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