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Crataegus laevigata or levigata

Crataegus laevigata is a species of Hawthorn from the Rosaceae family of plants. They also call it Midland Hawthorn, English Hawthorn, Woodland Hawthorn, or Mayflower. It is native to Western, Central Europe, and North Africa.

Crataegus laevigata
Crataegus laevigata, Southwark, London, UK

Crataegus laevigata is a large, thorny shrub or a small tree. It grows to about 26ft or 8m tall. The foliage is dark green, with three lobes on each side. The white flowers grow as corymbs of up to 12 and each flower has five petals. They are hermaphrodites and pollinated by insects. Crataegus laevigata flowers profusely in spring. After flowering, it produces pome-like fruit called Haw. The fruit is deep red in color and it is edible.

Crataegus laevigata
Crataegus laevigata

Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778), the Swedish botanist, originally named it Crataegus oxyacantha. This name was used for both common and Midland Hawthorns. Nikolaus Joseph Freiherr von Jacquin (1727-1817), the Dutch botanist, separated the species and named the Common Hawthorn as Crataegus monogyna. Jean Louis Marie Poiret (1755-1834) the French botanist, in 1798, named this plant Mespilus laevigata as a separate species, later Jean Irene Byatt changed the name using laevigata with Crataegus genus name.

Crataegus laevigata
Crataegus laevigata

How to grow Crataegus laevigata:

Grow Crataegus laevigata in the sun or partial shade. Plant it in moist but well-drained soil. Watch out for rust, leaf spot, powdery mildew, fire blight, borers, lace bugs, leafminers, caterpillars, and scale.

Crataegus laevigata
Crataegus laevigata

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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