Please Support This Free Site By Visiting Our Advertisers or Sponsors!

Nymphaea thermarum

Nymphaea thermarum is known as the smallest waterlilies. Dr. Eberhard Fischer, the German botanist, discovered Nymphaea thermarum on the edges of the hot spring, in Mashyuza, Rwanda, in 1987. He, therefore, named it them arum. The spring was later diverted and dried up and his samples helped continue the survival of the species. Thought this is the only species of water lily that can grow in mud rather than water.

Nymphaea thermarum
Nymphaea thermarum

The flowers have both male and female phases. The first flower blooms it is female and secretes a droplet to cover its stigma. Therefore, insects can carry pollen that gets caught in the droplet later falling into the stigma. At night the flower closes and the droplets disappear, the next day the flower acts as the male and releases pollen.

Nymphaea thermarum
Nymphaea thermarum

Nymphaea thermarum is in cultivation at Kew Gardens in the UK where these photographs are from as well as in Germany. It is propagated by seed. The seeds usually require CO2 to germinate it was not until Carlos Magdalena of Kew Gardens discovered this and grew the plants in pots of loam surrounded by water.

It generally forms rosettes of 30cm or 12 in wide. The leaves or lily pads are bright green. The flowers are white and have yellow stamens. They grow a few centimeters above the plant.

Nymphaea thermarum
Nymphaea thermarum at Kew Gardens, London, UK

Also, read about other rare waterlilies at Kew Gardens: Nymphaea ‘Kew’s Stowaway Blues’

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*