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Clematis integrifolia

Clematis integrifolia is from the Ranunculaceae family of plants. It is a woody-based sub-shrub. It is herbaceous and clump-forming. It has semi-climbing stems. It is a short vine growing only about 3ft or 90cm. It is native to Europe and Asia. It is also called the Solitary Clematis, Entire-leaved Clematis, or Virgin’s Bower.

The leaves are elliptical. It has dark purple-violet flowers in summer with a long flowering season. The flowers are urn-shaped or bell-shaped. The flowers appear in the current year’s growth. Clematis integrifolia flowers in summer and autumn. The flowers have twisted violet sepals. The stamens are creamy-white.

Clematis integrifolia
Clematis integrifolia
Ranunculaceae Clematis integrifolia
Clematis integrifolia

How to grow Clematis integrifolia

Grow Clematis integrifolia in a cool and shaded area, especially in hot climates. It can tolerate the sun but it needs to keep its roots cool. Plant it in moist but well-drained soil. Keep a consistent moisture level but never soggy. Use pebbles to keep its root cool. Always plant Clematis integrifolia with its crown level with the soil. Propagate Clematis integrifolia by layering or seeds or semi-hardwood cuttings. Watch out for aphids, earwigs. and caterpillars. Also, Clematis integrifolia is susceptible to powdery mildew and fungal leaf spot.

See photos below: after the flowers are done the plant looks very nice with the seeds. They look like an unusual flower themselves.

Clematis Integrifolia
Clematis integrifolia late summer seeds
Clematis Integrifolia
Clematis integrifolia after flowering
Clematis Integrifolia
Clematis integrifolia seeds

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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