Please Support This Free Site By Visiting Our Advertisers or Sponsors!

Clematis ‘Vancouver Starry Nights’

Clematis ‘Vancouver™ Starry Nights’ is part of the Ranunculaceae family of plants. It is also known as Clematis ‘Starry Night’. It is a hybrid Clematis. It is part of the Vancouver series and was originated in Canada.

It is a compact, multi-stemmed woody vine. It is deciduous. The leaves are compound and bright green. It is low-maintenance. Clematis ‘Vancouver Starry Nights’ can grow to 7ft or 2m tall.

Clematis 'Vancouver Starry Nights'
Clematis ‘Vancouver Starry Nights’ in Los Angeles, California

Clematis ‘Vancouver Starry Nights’ has purple-violet flowers. The petals have reddish highlights. The flowers can be as large as 8in or 20cm. They are star-shaped. It blooms on old growth. Sometimes re-flowers in late summer. The flowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds.

The seeds are sterile. Propagate Clematis ‘Vancouver Starry Nights’ from cuttings or division. Prune dead or damaged or weak vines in late winter.

Grow Clematis ‘Vancouver Starry Nights’ in the sun or partial shade. Plant it in humus-rich, fertile, and moist soil. It does not like wet soil, so it should be well-drained. Keep the roots cool using rocks or other plants. You can grow Clematis ‘Vancouver Starry Nights’ in containers. It would require more regular watering in a container. Clematis ‘Vancouver Starry Nights’ will require some sort of support. Plant it near a fence or a trellis.

Clematis 'Vancouver Starry Nights'
Clematis ‘Vancouver Starry Nights’

Also read about other Clematis:

Clematis ‘Mrs Cholmondeley’
Clematis ‘Nelly Moser’

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*