Brugmansia suaveolens

Brugmansia suaveolens also known as Angel’s Trumpet, Snowy Angel’s Trumpet, Angel’s Tears, Brugmansia suaveolens White, Datura suaveolens, Brazil’s White Angel Trumpet, Huanduc, Tsuaak, Tompeta del jucio, Wahashupa, Peji, Ishauna or Maikoa. It is part of the Solanaceae family of plants. Native to Brazil, it is a tropical, semi-evergreen shrub. It flowers with large, fragrant, white, trumpet-shaped flowers that hang down from the branches. The flowers that are 12in or 30cm long appear from mid-summer to autumn and become more fragrant in the evening to attract pollinating moth and the flowers close and open depending on the time of the day.

Brugmansia suaveolens
Brugmansia suaveolens

It grows to about 8ft or 2.4m. It was first published by Carl Ludwig Welldenow in 1809 named with its former name Datura suaveolens, however, it was changed to Brugmansia suaveolens in 1823 by Friedrich von Berchtold and Jan Presi.

Brugmansia suaveolens
Brugmansia suaveolens

Plant Brugmansia suaveolens in the sun in humus-rich, moist but well-drained soil. Fertilize them regularly during growing and flowering season. They are suited for warmer climates as they require a minimum of 50°F or 10°C. Interestingly this plant has two major stages in its life, first, it grows as a single stock to a height of 1.5m or 5ft before they branch out into fork configuration. It will not flower until it reaches this stage and as it flowers on new growth it is any new growth after this stage.

Brugmansia suaveolens are disease-free but watch out for aphids, whitefly, thrips, red spider mite, or mealybugs especially if you are growing them in a greenhouse. Propagate by seeds or cuttings. If you take a cutting from the lower part of the plant, then you need to wait until it grows to a height of the fork as explained above, however, cuttings from the top of the plant will flower at lower heights. Brugmansia suaveolens plant is low flammable and suitable to plant where the risk of fire is higher.

Brugmansia suaveolens
Brugmansia suaveolens

It has some traditional medicinal uses including extracts of the flower as pain killers or the seeds mixed with water for analgesic effects. And culturally it has been used in brews for rituals. Every part of this plant is poisonous with the seeds and the leaves being the worst and could cause paralysis.

About Online Flower Garden & Dino

Dino
I am a flower enthusiast and a gardener at heart. Ever since childhood I loved reading about plants and started gardening at an early age. First by helping my father in the garden and later managing a large garden myself in my teen years. I planted and cared for a large number of plants, flowers, and trees both outdoors and in a greenhouse. To this day I enjoy visiting gardens and parks and learning about new and old specimens and varieties of plants.

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